*Some medical school students who believe in a woman’s right to choose an abortion say they won’t offer the service to their future clients because of possible threats against their lives. Recent news stories such as the one about the slaying of George Tiller, a Kansas physician who performed late abortions, has them afraid to get involved. “I think for a lot of students right now, it’s very hard to be confronted with the constant negative energy and constant fighting” that surrounds abortion, Devin Miller told the Washington Post. Miller is a medical school student who grew up in a southern Virginia city where antiabortion sentiment runs high. Medical students who want training in the procedure usually must arrange an elective “externship” in Northern Virginia so as not to bring attention to themselves, she said. Thirty-six years after it was legalized, abortion remains one of the most common procedures in American medicine — and the most stigmatized. In 2005, 1.2 million abortions were performed, still Miller said “There’s this feeling it’s dirty and should not be spoken about. It’s hard to be brave and seek everything out yourself.” Even before Tiller’s death, and before abortion became entangled in the rancorous debate about health-care reform (antiabortion groups say it will expand abortion, a claim reform advocates say is false), the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists warned that “the availability of abortion services is in jeopardy.” The shortage of doctors willing to perform abortions “has huge public health implications,” said Lois Backus, executive director of the Philadelphia-based Medical Students for Choice. The organization was founded in 1993 after the murder of a Florida doctor. Backus said because about half of pregnancies are unintended, most doctors will at some point treat women confronting a choice about pregnancy. Although such care was once common, few physicians currently offer abortion services in their offices, fearing they will be targeted by abortion foes. Instead, Backus said, many tell patients facing unwanted pregnancy to look in the Yellow Pages or call Planned Parenthood.