Has anyone noticed that Zoe Saldana has become a star? She played “the Black girl” in that awful Brittany Spears Crossroads, was the cute girl that starred in Drumline, the only reason I watched Guess Who?, popped up in Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, The Terminal, and Vantage Point but last year she appeared in back-to-back blockbusters Star Trek and James Cameron’s cinema landscape changing Avatar and it was obvious that a star was born.

Even more evidence is that she shares the billing with Chris Rock and Martin Lawrence in this weekend’s Death at a Funeral and gets top-billing in next weekend’s The Losers. The 31-year-old has become the new “It” girl of color in Hollywood and can be found on the covers this month’s issues of Essence, Glamour and Nylon.

There’s a sequel to Star Trek set to start filming soon, Avatar is the highest-grossing movie ever, a sequel, spinoff something will come of it and she’s starring in the heist film Takers with Hayden Christensen, Idris Elba, T.I. and others this summer. Not too bad for the girl with the beautiful face and accents all through her name that seemed prime for a breakout role.

But she’s a little deeper than her beauty and ability to recite lines; she was recently honored at the inaugural St. Jude Estrellas Por La Vida (Stars for Life) Gala on April 6th. Ms. Saldana has been a supporter of St. Jude since 2005 and has made it her charity of choice at events nationwide. Black Women in Hollywood recently spotlighted her and others for helping to transform the images of Black women in television and film. However, race seems to be an issue she likes to stay away from. Being of a mixed racial background, she’s been able to embrace a universal cultural appeal and believes that the ethnic label in Hollywood is “the new N-word”.

She also speaks pretty freely in terms of sex and nudity, claiming in Essence to “love it, love it, love it and can’t get enough of it” in reference to sex. Of nudity, “I don’t believe the body is something to hide.” She believes that American culture is becoming more violent by not educating and making people aware of the beauty of sexuality; I am now a hater of her boyfriend Keith Britton!

Check out Zoe in Death at a Funeral (opening today), The Losers (April 23rd) and Takers (August 20th).

 About the writer

Between rhetoric and reality is where you’ll find The World According to Teef. Plainfield, NJ native Al-Lateef Farmer is a self-styled social documentarian that tackles everything from politics to pop culture, Reality TV to relationships with a brand of social commentary rooted in independent thought that is unfiltered, uncensored, unforgiving, but never unreal! Take a trip to his world at http://worldaccording2teef.blogspot.com/