*Before Hollywood and the media decide who the world’s next “most beautiful” or “sexiest” person is or before a woman crashes on another diet they cold use a dose of reality a la Niecy Nash.

“I am a 40-year-old mother of three, I’ve got three C-sections under my belly,” were her proud parting words as she recently exited the Dancing With the Stars competition.  

Nash knows the truth is that many women in America can relate to her as opposed the image of near perfection Hollywood portrays.

Part II of the Nash feature picks up a portion of the interview in which the actress was well versed on the subjects of beauty, sex appeal and self esteem.

Austin:

What is sexy?

Nash:

More than any visual feature, the sexiest thing to me about a person is confidence.  It is just so sexy and it draws a person in every time.

Austin:

What about beauty?

Nash:

Beauty is that confidence personified.  When you love yourself, so many things about you become beautiful that you weren’t even present to. (Chuckling)  My grandmother use to say, all the time when girls would say they don’t like their weight or they don’t like the way they look, ‘Baby, when you the only naked woman in the room you looks real good.’ I’d say yes Grandmother!

. . .What is closest around you is what you behold as beautiful.  I don’t have a desire to be or look like anybody else.  I’m so happy to be a Black woman.  I’m so happy that I can eat fried chicken and macaroni and not apologize for it.  

Austin:

Should women use their sex appeal to get ahead?

Nash

I think you should use what you got when you are good and dog on ready.  Not necessarily to get ahead, but if you’re sexy, naturally what can you do about that?

Austin:

Would you say your standard of beauty is an African American or Black standard?

Nash

(Pause) Ummm–I’m gonna go with yes. What is closest around you is what you behold as beautiful.  I don’t have a desire to be or look like anybody else.  I’m so happy to be a Black woman.  I’m so happy that I can eat fried chicken and macaroni and not apologize for it.  I’m so happy that men that love me love my jiggly parts cus they momma had jiggly parts. I’m just happy I don’t have to live my life on a diet.

Austin:

Niecy Nash I believe you just liberated some women in this country, Black, White and other.

Nash said when some African American men saw her out of character (from Reno 911) they were disappointed.  

Adding, “I’m so happy that men that love me love my jiggly parts cus they (sic) momma had jiggly parts. I’m just happy I don’t have to live my life on a diet.”

But the vast majority of  weight obsessed would disagree.  

The comedian confidently “wiggled her jiggle” all the way to  the top five on Dancing With the Stars often joking about wanting a snack and not being bothered by the fact that she couldn’t “hoola hoop with a Cheerio.”

In reality, however, People reports Nash is a size 8, much smaller the national average size of American women,  a 14. Like most adult women with children her weight has varied and five years ago she was 50 pounds heavier.  Adopting a more sensible diet and being more active with her kids helped Nash shed the pounds and keep them off.

It’s that self-love and refusal to conform to Hollywood ‘s cookie cutter image of beauty that has gotten her this far.

I asked the mother of three-2 daughters and a son– how she thought the arrival of Tiana, Disney’s first African American Princess – another sassy, positive portrayal of Black Beauty– would impact the industry, wondering if this will open more doors for Black actresses.

“I don’t know if it’s going to make an impact, you would like to think so.  Look at Brandy and Whitney Houston, Cheetah Girls with Raven Simone.”

Sounding slightly disgruntled, she continues, “There have been attempts.  I know in primetime there isn’t one show being led by an African American woman or man.”

Nash once co-starred in the short-lived FOX prime time show, “Do Not Disturb” with Jerry O’Connell, and says she didn’t think they got a fair shot when shows with lower ratings were allowed to breath.  No complaints, just an inside observation from an actress who has been more consistently employed than many, black or white.

“I think the powers that be play what they want to see and not the masses.. . .the truth of the matter is when you cast a wide net, it’s not just Black people you scoop up.

Ever glamorous, unapologetically bold and self-defined, Niecy Nash is doing Hollywood her way.  She says in the future she may take on the role of talk show host.

“My goal in the industry is to make an impact in such a way that people are better after they leave my presence than when they came . . .and for America to be better and if I can help just a little bit in the process that’s my plan.”

By the end of this interview I realize Nash is a therapist at heart–that one way or another –on strangers doorsteps or the dance floor – she wants to rescue people from what she calls “foolishness” and “mayhem”  on Clean House, encouraging the spirits and hearts of those who see her.

You may catch Niecy Nash on the 8th season of Clean House or as a celebrity panelist on the entertainment news show, The Insider.