Eva Mendez and Will Ferrell

*Samuel L. Jackson and Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson did not attend the press junket for the whack comedy, “The Other Guys,” and when you see the film you will know why-there will be no spoilers here. But Will Ferrell, Mark Wahberg and Eva Mendes were there.

QUESTION: EVA, THE FUNNIEST SCENE IN THE MOVIE IS WHEN MARK MEETS YOU. HOW IS IT IN REAL LIFE WHEN GUYS MEET YOU?

EVA MENDES: Wow. God. I don’t know. The truth is-oh God, I’m going to sound like an asshole for saying this. The fame walks in the door before you do, if you know what I mean by that. Please help me out. So, you no longer know how men react to you. They just react to, like, ‘Dude, there’s that famous girl from ‘Training Day in the other room,’ kind of. Yeah.

WILL FERRELL: You are a hot lady, though.

MENDES: But it’s just that I don’t feel like I get that genuine response anymore.

QUESTION: DO YOU THINK THAT IF YOU WORKED AT A BLOCKBUSTER VIDEO THAT MEN WOULD BE LIKE, ‘AWW, SHE’S ALL RIGHT?’

MENDES: Well, I’ll tell you a little story actually. I did this film with Will Smith a few years ago called ‘Hitch’ and we went around the world promoting the film and he calls me Reva. So one day we were in
Rio and we were doing press. He came back and we had some coffee and stuff and he goes, ‘Reva, I thought that Reva was it. She’s a beautiful girl. This is it. Reva Melendes.’ That’s what he calls me. He goes, ‘Well, I just went down to the coffee shop and I saw about five Reva’s work there. In Brazil you’re not a big deal.’ It puts it all into perspective.

QUESTION: CAN YOU TALK ABOUT YOUR FAVORITE SCENES?

FERRELL: Favorite scenes. I’m going to have to say definitely Eva and Mark and I at the dinner table for the first time discussing our relationship.

MARK WAHLBERG: I like that one, too.

FERRELL: Just the combination of Eva’s earnestness and Mark’s just general dumbfounded reaction to the fact that all of this could be possible and then my character’s nonchalance about it, as well. That was a scene that we could’ve filmed all day long. The prior scene where we’re going over the information, in the living room, and then Eva walks in, that’s a genuine reaction from Mark, when he’s laughing, going, ‘Seriously, who is that?’ That’s not acting.

QUESTION: WAS IT WRITTEN THAT WAY WITH YOU JUST BEING DUMBFOUNDED THE WHOLE TIME?

WAHLBERG: Well, I certainly didn’t see any other way to play it.  I think at one point he goes, ‘Maybe you should engage them a little bit more.’ I said, ‘Nah. I don’t think so.’ I did not touch my food. I just kept talking about how my stomach hurt so much.

QUESTION: THERE’S A LOT OF JOKES ABOUT POP CULTURE IN THE FILM AND OF COURSE THERE’S THE RUNNING JOKE ABOUT TLC. WERE THOSE IN THE SCRIPT OR WAS A LOT OF THAT IMPROVISED ON THE SPOT?

FERRELL: I think a lot of that was in the script. I don’t really remember.

QUESTION: MARK, CAN YOU TALK ABOUT THE FIGHT SCENE WITH ROB RIGGLE, A GUY WHO WAS A MARINE WHO FOUGHT IN AFGHANISTAN AND IRAQ?

WAHLBERG: I choked the shit out of that big motherfucker. I choked the shit out of Will, too.

FERRELL: He’s not kidding. Those four guys had to wrestle for I don’t know how many takes just to get that nice little two minutes of film.

QUESTION: WAS THE BALLET STEPS A DOUBLE?

WAHLBERG: Yeah. I thought it was easier than it was. I trained with a guy for a while and then when it came down to it I couldn’t really deliver

QUESTION: MARK, DID YOU HAVE ANY INPUT IN THE SHOOTING OF DEREK JETER?

WAHLBERG: No, but I was certainly thrilled to do it. I felt bad afterwards because he’s such a nice guy.

QUESTION: WILL AND MARK, YOU GUYS ARE BOTH DADS. ARE YOU GOING TO LET YOUR KIDS WATCH THIS MOVIE?

FERRELL: My six year old is just starting to figure out what it is [I do]. Like, just this summer he leaned over to me and said, ‘By the way, dad, I know what you do. I know you are in movies, just so you know.’ But he still doesn’t really know. I mean this movie is probably still a little too old for him probably.

QUESTION: HAS HE SEEN ‘ELF’?

FERRELL: No.

MENDES: That’s just mean.

FERRELL: I think he saw it when he was two or three years old when I had to float away on the iceberg. I said, ‘You keep watching it. You quit crying. This is about Christmas. This is about joy. Shut up.’

QUESTION: MARK?

WAHLBERG: I never let my kids see anything I do.

QUESTION: DO THEY KNOW WHAT YOU DO?

WAHLBERG: Oh, yeah.

QUESTION: EVA, DO YOU LET YOUR FIFTEEN-YEAR-OLD ADOPTED SON WATCH ANY OF YOUR MOVIES?

MENDES: Terry is only allowed to see just home movies.

FERRELL: How is Terry by the way?

MENDES: Terry is good. He’s off to camp.

FERRELL: You adopted him three weeks ago?

MENDES: Three weeks ago. He’s fifteen, now almost sixteen.

FERRELL: So he’s really just like a guy living in your house.
MENDES: He’s kind of like a guy living in my house.

QUESTION: A LOT OF THIS MOVIE TALKS ABOUT PARTNERS AND GETTING THEIR BACKS. IS THAT SIMILAR TO DOING A COMEDY, WATCHING EACH OTHER’S BACKS?

FERRELL: Uh, no. I feel like it’s more important to be really cut throat on a set and not look out for each other. That provides a certain tension and it makes for a horrible work environment, but boy, does that pop onscreen.