*Bread for the world reports that according to new hunger data released today by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), 25.1 percent of African-American households suffered from food insecurity in 2010. Among African-American households with children, the figure is much higher—nearly one in three. These figures remain higher than the general population and more than double those of non-Hispanic white households.

“High rates of unemployment have made it difficult for many U.S. households to put food on the table—but communities of color continue to be disproportionately impacted,” said Rev. Derrick Boykin, associate for African American Leadership Outreach at Bread for the World.

One in five Americans—and nearly one in four African-Americans—currently participate in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps). Although hunger among African-Americans and Hispanics remains unconscionably high—especially when compared to non-Hispanic white Americans—it would be much higher were it not for federally-funded safety-net programs that helped keep millions of Americans from going hungry.

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