Larry Buford

*If  fame and fortune is all it’s cracked up to be, why are there so many shipwrecked, unhappy, disillusioned, rich and famous people? Why are so many people who seemingly have everything either going to jail; to rehab; victimizing others; being victimized themselves; self-destructing; and doing things that  just don’t make any sense whatsoever?

Think of some of the rock stars, movie stars, sports figures, televangelists, and politicians who have hit the doldrums after a swift downward spiral. Is it greed? Discontentment? Is there something in their orbit that caused them to fizzle after reaching a certain altitude? Apparently along the way something got out of order like the cart before the horse got spun way out of control.

Maybe some people are cast into roles prematurely or perhaps into roles never intended for them in the first place. A successful attorney once confided dissatisfaction in her career choice. Her parents had decided it for her. It’s a shame to reach the top of the ladder of success only to find out the ladder is leaning on the wrong building. A proverb says the way of a man may seem right, but the end thereof  is death (or separation).

Are so many people being pushed, driven, and separated from whom they really are or who they were meant to become? Some blame it on forces of darkness. However, if they are truly honest with themselves, I’ll bet anyone of  them can tell you a particular moment when they refused counsel – or perhaps heard an inner voice speaking to them saying “no,” “stop,” “turnaround,” or “resist” – and ignored the warning. Making right decisions is a responsibility we all have, and is the mark of maturity. When we get so carried away, so high and mighty that we cannot humble ourselves, we are only asking for trouble.

Larry Buford is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer. Author of “Things Are Gettin’ Outta Hand” (Steuben Pub) www.amazon.com. Available at Smiley’s Bookstore in Carson CA, and Chaucer’s in Santa Barbara CA. Visit the author at www.editorialbylarry.com. (213) 220-8101