Rev. Marvin Winans preaches during a Sunday morning service at Perfecting Church in Detroit, Sunday May 20, 2012, his first appearance before the whole congregation since being beaten and carjacked

*Three young men were arraigned Sunday in the assault and carjacking of Detroit pastor and gospel singer Marvin Winans.

The office of Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy identified the suspects as Detroit residents Montoya Givens and Christopher Moorehead, both 20, and Brian K. Young, 18, of Macomb County’s Clinton Township, reports the Associated Press. They are charged with carjacking, unarmed robbery and conspiracy, said Maria Miller, Worthy’s spokeswoman.

If convicted, the trio could be sentenced to life in prison.

The men appeared in Detroit’s 36th District Court and were ordered held on $200,000 bonds. Their preliminary examinations, in which a judge decides where there’s enough evidence for the case to go to trial, are June 1.

Montoya Givens

Winans, 54, was attacked Wednesday afternoon while pumping gas in Detroit. The robbers took his sport utility vehicle, Rolex watch, cash and credit cards.

“This is just an example of the diligence that our officers put forth when investigating criminal cases,” police Chief Ralph Godbee said in a statement Sunday.

Winans sustained bruises and scrapes and was treated at a hospital and released. He is pastor of the 4,500-member Perfecting Church and delivered singer Whitney Houston’s eulogy in February.

“I’m just saddened that it has come to this,” Winans said shortly after the attack. “This kind of nonsense just has to stop. It’s just the savageness of what’s happening in the street.”

He continued with that message Sunday, as his congregants welcomed him with cheers and applause.

Recalling what he said to a woman who gave him a ride to his church after the attack, Winans said he told her, “I’m just sad … to think we have reared young men to prey — P-R-E-Y — on people that they think are weaker.”

Winans told reporters before the service that he believes Detroit can be turned around.

“The city is fixable, and it starts with the men of the city, in particular the black men,” he said. “And I … want to urge all of you men who hear me to go and get your sons. I’m not bitter. I’m not upset. I’m saddened by what has taken place. But I’m also inspired. We have to make a change in this city.”