chick-fil-a

*To think, the entire base divide in modern American culture seems to have manifested itself in – of all places – a war of words and series of counter-protests over a fast food chain best known for its fried chicken and its waffle fries. It seems only fitting.

For the last week and a half, the biggest story in the nation that doesn’t include “Olympics” or “London” in its headline has been the battle over Chick-fil-A’s gay marriage stance. That’s right. In a country with a plunging economy and a presidential election in a few months, this was the story that the media chose to whip into the new frenzy.

Honestly, it’s a ridiculous story right from the onset, with layers of stupidity upon stupidity stacked up like lettuce in one of the fast-food chain’s pre-packaged salads. The franchise’s CEO, Dan Walsh, was perfectly within his legal rights to issue a stupid statement about his stance on gay marriage on a radio show.

Boston mayor Tom Menino was equally as stupid in his attempts to try to block Chick-fil-A from opening a new franchise in the town – an attempt that quickly came to an end when he admitted that he had no legal rights to do so.

Mike Huckabee, the aw-schucks former governor of Arkansas, was really stupid when he created a “Chick-fil-A Appreciation Day” for August 2nd, citing the need to support a business that boasts “Christian principles and whose executives are willing to take a stand for the Godly values we espouse.” That led to a series of photo-ops for airheaded conservative politicians, one of them decidedly not in need of more Chick-fil-A. Finally, this idiot who confronted a poor worker at a Tucson location was the stupidest one of all.

We should all have had enough of this mass stupidity by now. The owner of a fast-food franchise has the right to hold whatever views he has, as long as his restaurants don’t discriminate against anyone. The owner of that franchise also has the right to open up restaurants where he wants too – standard business rules permitting. The public also has the right to boycott those restaurants in protest, and if there was enough public support for said protest, the rules of the free market would take over and the business would suffer as a result. Ta-da. Controversy over. Now, let’s all go back to talking about something that really matters.