anthony stokes*Good news for dying teenager Anthony Stokes.

An Atlanta children’s hospital has decided to reverse its decision to deny young Stokes a life-saving heart transplant.

Initially Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston determined that Stokes was ineligible to be on the waiting list because of a history of “non-compliance.”

Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston, the only facility in Georgia that does pediatric transplants, initially ruled that 15-year-old Anthony Stokes was ineligible to be on the waiting list because of a history of “non-compliance.”

And that’s where the controversy started … just what was the criteria that doctors used to come to that conclusion? Melencia Hamilton, Stokes’ mother, told theGrio that her son doesn’t have a medical history to establish non-compliance.

“He has taken everything [medication] they have given him,” she said. “I don’t know why they crossed him off like that. They just said it was non-compliance.”

The teenager’s health crisis is fairly new because until recently all was well with him. However, three weeks ago he complained of shortness of breath and chest pains, was diagnosed with an enlarged heart and has been fighting for survival ever since.

His mom suspects his low grades at school and brushes with the law influenced medical practitioners to conclude he would be a poor candidate to keep up with pre-care treatment.

Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta made the sudden U-turn late Monday, after the story, which made national headlines, set the Internet and social networking sites ablaze.

Family spokesman Mark Bell told NBC News that hospital officials said Stokes was now a candidate for a donor heart. According to reports, Bell was told the teenager would be placed on the list for a heart transplant and that he would be first in line because of his weakened heart condition.

Bell adds they did not offer a reason as to why they changed their minds.

Stokes suffers from dilated cardiomyopathy, in which the heart’s main pumping chamber fails to pump enough blood. Without a new heart doctors predict he could die in six months from heart failure.

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