Mr. Peabody & Sherman

Mr. Peabody & Sherman visit ancient Egypt

*That’s right! “Mr. Peabody & Sherman” is no ordinary family. Not only is Mr. Peabody a dog, but he’s the parent. Fans of Peabody, of course, already know this. However, this is the first time Mr. Peabody & Sherman are on the big screen.

Cast members Ty Burrell (“Modern Family”), Max Charles (“The Amazing Spiderman 2”), and director Rob Minkoff (“The Lion King,” “The Haunted Mansion,” “Stuart Little”) were recently across the street from the scenic Central Park (dogs love the park) inside the Ritz Carlton Hotel in New York City. They were here to tout their tour de force flight of fancy movie magic that can be seen in 3D.

Sherman (Charles) is the adopted son of Mr. Peabody (Burrell) and true to form, Burrell is an adoptive father himself. Sherman is bullied in school because his dad is a dog and no doubt Burrell’s Black daughter will face challenges also when she is older. Although animated, “Mr. Peabody” has across the board appeal. Besides being entertaining, it has great educational value and shows how devastating bullying can be to children. The Film Strip asked about the role bullying plays in the movie. “One of the things that happened in 2011 during the development process was the idea to change Sherman’s nemesis from a boy to a girl, Penny (Ariel Winter),” Minkoff said.

“I think bullying is a problem that needs to be addressed and I think the fact that we have it in the film does address it,” Minkoff continued. “I think that it’s important that we understand why people bully, where it comes from. It usually comes from people not understanding, certainly not accepting and not being tolerant.” Burrell concurred wholeheartedly with Minkoff. “It’s a universal feeling for parents who suddenly have to send their kids into the world and we don’t know how the world is going to affect them,” Burrell added, “and very often we can’t control how the world will affect them.”

On a more upbeat note, Burrell became exuberant about the whole filmmaking procedure. “The stars of this are really the director and the animators,” Burrell opined. “The voices are important, but they are really [supporting] roles to a big, super-magical thing that I’d never been a part of. As far as the process goes, it’s the most thrilling thing I’ve ever done because I had no idea what I was going to see. You’re in a room [when you record your lines] and it’s kind of impossible to see all the imagery when you’re making it. It was one of the most fun times I’ve ever had seeing the movie itself, which I saw a few weeks ago and loved.”

Both Burrell and Charles loved the time machine travel adventure afforded them by the WABAC. “I learned a lot about different people and different places in a fun way,” Charles gleefully confessed.

“Mr. Peabody and Sherman” is also voiced by Dennis Haysbert, Adam Alex-Malle and Melvin Breedlove.

Glasses worn in the film can be attained at coastal.com. The following is a partial statement about their charitable work:  “For every pair of glasses we sell, we donate a pair to someone in need. At Coastal Vision, we understand the importance that good vision plays in a person’s quality of life. We have seen firsthand the impact that good vision has on a child’s ability to learn how to read and write and to the education that becomes the foundation for their adult life. We also witnessed the impact of good vision on an adult’s ability to learn new skills and to earn a living to support themselves and their family.”

“Mr. Peabody and Sherman” is also voiced by Dennis Haysbert, Adam AlexMalle and Melvin Breedlove.

Glasses worn in the film can be attained at coastal.com. The following is a partial statement about their charitable work:  “For every pair of glasses we sell, we donate a pair to someone in need. At Coastal Vision, we understand the importance that good vision plays in a person’s quality of life. We have seen firsthand the impact that good vision has on a child’s ability to learn how to read and write and to the education that becomes the foundation for their adult life. We also witnessed the impact of good vision on an adult’s ability to learn new skills and to earn a living to support themselves and their family.”

Syndicated entertainment reporter Marie Moore covers film and TV from her New York City base. Contact her at [email protected].