Neil deGrasse Tyson

*These days, a science fiction film about outer space isn’t really legit until astrophysicist/cosmologist Neil deGrasse Tyson gives it his stamp of approval.

His tweeted gripes about the scientific inaccuracies in last year’s Sandra Bullock film “Gravity” got just as much media attention as it did rave reviews and Oscar nominations.

With Christopher Nolan’s “Interstellar” arriving in theaters last Wednesday – starring Matthew McConaughey as an astronaut tasked with finding planetary alternatives to Earth after our world becomes an uninhabitable ball of dust – Tyson was on Twitter picking it apart by Sunday.

But good news for the filmmakers – “Interstellar” was given Tyson’s rare seal of approval.

David Gyasi

Interstellar: David Gyasias as Romilly, an expert in the temporal effects of wormholes and black holes

Based on his series of tweets about how well the film followed such scientific principles as gravitational fields, Tyson thought “Interstellar” was pretty accurate.

In fact, he praises the movie for allowing viewers to experience Einstein’s Curvature of Space and Relativity of Time theories like no other movie, and that the film’s scientific knowledge of black holes and wormholes is factually correct.

Left to right: Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, and David Gyasi in INTERSTELLAR, from Paramount Pictures and Warner Brothers Entertainment.

Left to right: Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, and David Gyasi in INTERSTELLAR, from Paramount Pictures and Warner Brothers Entertainment.

But the tweets weren’t all glowing. One questioned the choice of a particular potential substitute planet:

He also warns us:

And there was this little discrepancy:


And lest anyone get it twisted…

During a recent press conference for “Interstellar,” star McConaughey admitted that he thought very little of space exploration and its importance before starring in the project:

“Interstellar” is in theaters nationwide.

Watch the trailer below: