michael brown's stepfather Louis Head

UPdate …

Louis Head, the stepfather of Michael Brown said Wednesday that his emotions “got the best of me” when he urged a crowd in Ferguson, Missouri, to “burn this bitch down” after a grand jury declined to indict (white) police officer Darren Wilson for shooting his stepson to death.

In a statement, Head, who is married to Brown’s mother, apologized to those “who read my pain and anger as a true desire for what I want for our community. It wasn’t.”

“I was so angry and full of raw emotions, as so many others were, and granted, I screamed out words that I shouldn’t have screamed in the heat of the moment,” Head’s statement said.

The statement also criticized how authorities handled the grand jury announcement:

“But to place blame solely on me for the conditions of our community, and country, after the grand jury decision goes way too far and is as wrong as the decision itself. To declare a state of emergency and send a message of war, and not peace, before a grand jury decision was announced is also wrong. In the end, I’ve lived in this community for a long time. The last thing I truly wanted was to see it go up in flames. In spite of my frustration, it really hurt to see that. Now it’s time to rebuild. If we are to honor Michael Brown’s memory, we need to work together to make rebuilding happen.”

Earlier we reported ….

*The emotion of Michael Brown’s stepfather may have put him in the sights of the authorities.

CNN reports that Ferguson police are considering whether or not to charge Louis Head for inciting a riot after the grand jury’s decision to not indict police officer Darren Wilson for killing Brown by yelling “Burn this bitch down.”

Head was among a slew of people who took to the streets after the decision was announced on November. 24.

Speaking to TV and radio host Sean Hannity, Ferguson police chief Tom Jackson confirmed that although no charges have been filed yet against Head, the department is interviewing people who know Head and were with him on the day after prosecuting attorney Robert McCulloch announced the non-indictment was announced to determine whether he intended to start a riot.

“We are pursuing those comments, and there’s a lot of discussion going on about that right now, but I really can’t get into that at this time,” Jackson told Hannity.

Within an hour after the McCulloch’s announcement, reports of police cars being set on fire and looting in Ferguson surfaced. In light of the chaos that came after the grand jury’s decision, many wonder about the reason why McCulloch chose to make the announcement at night, when crowd control was unmanageable.

Despite the presence of National Guard troops, they were nowhere to be found in areas where they could’ve prevented the violence on the streets. According to USA Today, Ferguson Mayor James Knowles criticized the delay in deploying National Guard troops to help stop the violence in a press conference held Tuesday.

For Knowles, the delay was ‘deeply concerning’ as he acknowledged that Guard troops were available but were not deployed when city officials asked. Rather than being assigned where the violence was most prevalent, Knowles stated that National Guard troopers were “keeping the peace at a courthouse, patrolling the outskirts of town and preventing disturbances in other suburbs”

For more on the Ferguson’s police investigation of Louis Head, check out the video below: