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Andrew R. Yuen of the Urban Fish and Wildlife Service, Urban Wildlife Conservation Program speaks at the Frog Spot in support of the LA River Revitalization efforts.

*A child should always take care of his mother that birthed him, cared for him and raised him. When she becomes old and frail, the child must tend to her wounds, feed her when she is hungry and see about her needs, just as she did the child. In that same respect, we as a human race should care for our mother, the planet earth, in the same manner.

As individuals, we humans cannot affect the entire planet positively or negatively, however if each of us got up and did something, as a collective, we would be able to make a real difference.
That’s what  officials said inLate August as they gathered to celebrate the revitalization of the Los Angeles River.

Their hope was to revitalize the area located along the LA River bike path, a curvy path that stretches through the Glendale Narrows all the way back into Long Beach, California. Down the concrete laden path, built after the 1938 Los Angeles Flood, the path empties out into the San Pedro Bay in Long Beach.

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FoLAR’s 38’mobile visitor and education center, the Los Angeles River Rover educates residents all over Los Angeles about how water moves through the city and eventually into the ocean.

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Los Angeles residents enjoy an educational lesson about how the water is filtered into the Los Angeles River and eventually into the ocean.

This effort is part of the Southern California Urban Wildlife Refuge Project that reaches deep into Los Angeles, San Diego and Ventura’s diverse urban core to bring back nature to its residents and underscore the importance of wildlife and natural habitat conservation, which are essential components to sustaining healthy communities.

The event celebrated the revitalization of the Los Angeles River and the partnership between the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, the Los Angeles Conservation Corps and the Friends of the Los Angeles River, Saturday, August 29th at The Frog Spot, along the LA River bike path, from 12 to 2 p.m.

Supporting these types of organizations and the elected officials speaking out for them is an important first step in beginning the healing process for our planet that is reeling from centuries of neglect.

The beautiful LA River Path is easy to get to off of the 210 and 5 freeways and coupled with the amazing Los Angeles weather, makes for a spectacular family treat. Anchored in the south by the San Diego National Wildlife Refuge Complex and to the north by the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge Complex, the Southern California Urban Wildlife Refuge Project reaches deep into Los Angeles’ diverse urban core where the revitalization of the Los Angeles River is bringing back nature to urban residents.

For the most part, people live in cities and find it difficult to seek out nature. These types of places make nature accessible and combined with the educational facilities provided by the Los Angeles River Rover, a mobile river science education center, and others like it, learning and exploring the natural surrounding can be fun, safe and enjoyable for the whole family.

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LA City Council members Mitch O’Farrell, and David Ryu address the crowd along the LA River bike path.

Speakers at the event will include Wendy Butts of the Los Angeles Conservation Corps, Shelly Backlar from Friends of the Los Angeles River/River Rover, Councilman Mitch O’Farrell, and Councilman David Ryu.

Guests of the event had the opportunity to visit FoLAR’s 38’mobile visitor and education center, the Los Angeles River Rover, and participate in educational activities run by LACC’s L.A. River Corps and FoLAR’s Education Team.

The Frog Spot is located at 2825 Benedict Street, Los Angeles, CA, 90039. For more information about the LA River Revitalization Project, go to www.folar.org.

 

Story and photos by Troy Tieuel