Sister-Souljah-hillary-clinton*Sister Souljah may not care for TV and reads little fiction, but she is still well aware of the grip racism maintains on society as well as current movers and shakers in the politics.

Looking at Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton, Souljah is careful with her words during an interview with Time as she presented her thoughts.

“I want to control what I say so that I can be quoted properly. I have this past history of being misquoted or misunderstood,” the rapper-turned-author said as she slid an index card across the table to the publication’s writer.

“She reminds me too much of the slave plantation white wife of the white ‘Master.’ She talks down to people, is condescending and pandering. She even talked down to the Commander in Chief, President Barack Obama, while she was under his command!” the card reads.

Souljah’s comments about Clinton comes years after she was slammed by the Secretary of State’s husband, Bill Clinton, in 1992 for supposedly formulating hate. At the time, the Arkansas Governor was running for president and the country was reeling from riots in Los Angeles.

In an interview that year, Souljah stated that “if black people kill black people every day, why not have a week and kill white people?”

Clinton responded to Souljah’s comments by comparing her to former politician and KKK Grand Wizard David Duke. Despite his criticism, Souljah stands by what she said.

“If you ask me my view, even if it’s not your view, you have to handle that,” she says. “Don’t tell me I hurt your feelings. I’m not your kindergarten teacher.”

As for the 2016 presidential campaign, don’t expect to see Souljah rushing to the polls to exercise her right to vote.

“The only time I vote is if my soul is moved to do so,” she told Time. “If people are caught in the grips of choosing between eight or 10 candidates they hate—what is that? It’s almost like you are a political hostage.”

In addition to politics, Souljah touched on the power of racism with another index card which acknowledged that racism is so powerful that President Obama is “fearful and powerless to stop his military and police force from executing innocent people based on race.”

“One of the things that I tried to make clear,” Souljah says, “is that racism is a system of power. And that system did not go away. There have been changes in the nuances of it, but the system is still intact, and it’s still institutionalized.” Out of the spotlight, she’s able now to communicate her ideas through fiction that keeps her readership engrossed year after year. It’s a use of her fame that’s more comfortable, perhaps, than being a punching bag for politicians.

For more of Sister Souljah’s interview, click here.