James McVoy (Victor Frankenstein) and Daniel Radcliffe (Igor) in scene from 'Victor Frankenstein.'

James McVoy (Victor Frankenstein) and Daniel Radcliffe (Igor) in scene from ‘Victor Frankenstein.’

Victor Frankenstein,” opening November 25, has a different take on the legendary story.

Starring James McVoy (“X-Men,” has trysts with Kerry Washington in “King of Scotland” and Rosario Dawson in “Trance”) and Daniel Radcliffe (who had a date with a Black café worker in “Harry Potter” before he ended up in another realm), star as Victor Frankenstein and Igor respectively.

In New York at the Crosby Hotel discussing their film, McAvoy and Radcliffe talked about the joy and fun of working on a modern day adaptation. “Writer Max Landis has said the reason he was motivated to write this was the advent of Facebook,” McAvoy avowed.

“People at the forefront of technological capability use that knowledge to implement a massive change in the way that we live our lives; and that’s why he was inspired to write Frankenstein,” McAvoy continued.

“It’s about two guys with the keys to the kingdom or the fire of the Gods in their hands doing stuff that could be terrible or could change the world for the better—you never know. It’s about those people rather than just the monster.”

James McAvoy, director Paul McGuigan, and Daniel Radcliffe at the Crosby Hotel.

James McAvoy, director Paul McGuigan, and Daniel Radcliffe at the Crosby Hotel.

“For me,” Radcliffe added, “the thing I loved about the script when I read it was it was this big, bold, unapologetically entertaining cinematic action-adventure movie that also had at the heart of it this great and really interesting relationship story between these two guys that is quite a toxic in some ways. There is something really fun about it.”

“I think the thing that I liked about the script so much was it took a lot of different preconceptions about Frankenstein and ideas people have about the story, or think they know, twisted them and played around with them,” Radcliffe explained.

Both men with closely cropped hair were asked to explain the similarities. “It’s for a role I’ve been playing as an FBI guy who goes undercover with a bunch of Nazi white supremacists,” Radcliffe offered. “I’m not doing that but I just started filming a new gig in Philly and this is the haircut for that part,” McAvoy said.

Fans of Frankenstein can create their own monsters by going to www.Franken-Friend.com and put together pieces of their Facebook friends’ photos.

Syndicated Entertainment journalist Marie Moore reports on film and TV from her New York City base. Contact her at [email protected]

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