Tasha-Smith*In another case of celebrities being just like us, Tasha Smith has become the latest victim of not doing a background check on someone you plan on spending a life with.

Smith’s predicament stemmed from when her divorce from her manager Keith Rory Douglas was finalized back in March. Prior to Smith filing for divorce, she and Davis had been married for four years after dating for one year. While it seemed that things would’ve ended after the divorce was finalized, Clutch reports that the plot thickened “just a few days ago” when Smith cited fraud as the reason for annulling her marriage.

Turns out, Keith wasn’t Keith at all. He was actually a five-time divorcée with a criminal past that included not paying taxes in nearly 10 years.

Oh wait! There’s more.

Rory also lied about how many kids he actually had as well as the fact that (drumroll, please) he was cheating too.

Crazy, ha? A true case of fraud, indeed.

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Reflecting on Smith’s situation, Clutch voiced that the marriage and resulting annulment could’ve been avoided if she would’ve “waited a little longer” before becoming Mrs. Davis.

“On one hand you could argue getting married after being together for one year was too soon and Tasha would’ve known who she was about to jump the broom with had she waited a little longer,” the site stated.

“More time in the dating phase may have revealed Keith’s philandering ways, and possibly even a kid or two if the baby mamas popped up, but when you’re caught up with a con artist — or an extremely dishonest man — no amount of conversation is going to reveal his disastrous financial issues (until you file that first joint tax return) or a criminal past,” Clutch added while advocating for a better method. “But you know what will? A background check — and I mean an official one, not just a quick Google search, though that’s a good place to start before a date.

On the flipside, the site goes on to drop some food for thought with pointing out that “if you feel the need to do a background check on someone you’re planning to marry you probably shouldn’t be marrying them, until trust issues are resolved. As a result, it advocates doing a background check on your significant other in the early stages of the relationship, “perhaps somewhere between “I like this guy” and “I can see myself marrying him one day?”
“Getting to know a potential romantic mate is emotionally exhilarating, but if we look at this from a logical perspective, the fact is employers and landlords tend to know more about the people we’re dating than we do,” Clutch noted. “There’s certainly something to be said for good old conversation and asking tough questions but there’s also no better peace of mind than comes with having data to back up what someone tells you — or refute it.”

So what say you? Is it a crime to run a background check on a potential lover or is that more a cop out and dishonest move to resort to that type of thing?

Weigh in below: