In this handout photo provided by NBCUniversal, Quentin Tarantino accepts the award for Best Original Score - Motion Picture for "The Hateful Eight" during the 73rd Annual Golden Globe Awards at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on January 10, 2016 in Beverly Hills, California.

In this handout photo provided by NBCUniversal, Quentin Tarantino accepts the award for Best Original Score – Motion Picture for “The Hateful Eight” during the 73rd Annual Golden Globe Awards at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on January 10, 2016 in Beverly Hills, California.

*Between Quentin Tarantino referring to a music category as a “ghetto” and Sylvester Stallone thanking everyone on Planet Earth except “Creed” director Ryan Coogler for his Best Supporting Actor win – Black Twitter was not pleased.

Tarantino, director of “The Hateful Eight,” was dragged for his use of the word “ghetto” while accepting the award for best original score on behalf of the film’s composer Ennio Morricone.

Tarantino began by saying Morricone is his favorite composer. “And when I say favorite composer, I don’t mean movie composer — that ghetto,” he said. “I’m talking about Mozart, I’m talking about Beethoven, I’m talking about Schubert. That’s who I’m talking about.”

Social media pounced:

 

As luck would have it, presenter Jamie Foxx took the stage immediately after Tarantino and dead-panned “ghetto” with a befuddled look before introducing his daughter, Corinne as Miss Golden Globe.

In this handout photo provided by NBCUniversal, Sylvester Stallone accepts the award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture for "Creed" onstage during the 73rd Annual Golden Globe Awards at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on January 10, 2016 in Beverly Hills, California.

In this handout photo provided by NBCUniversal, Sylvester Stallone accepts the award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture for “Creed” onstage during the 73rd Annual Golden Globe Awards at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on January 10, 2016 in Beverly Hills, California.

Later, Stallone’s Best Supporting Actor acceptance speech took on the tone of a lifetime achievement award, as the “Rocky” actor and producer went back to the beginning of his career to thank producers Irwin Winkler and Bob Chartoff, “who actually mortgaged his house to take a chance on a mumbling actor and gave me the shot of a lifetime.” But somehow, he forgot to thank Coogler, the man who wrote his words and directed the performance that earned him his first Golden Globe since the original “Rocky” in 1977. Cue Twitter:

Shortly after the dragging commenced on Twitter, it was reported that Stallone did thank both Coogler and his co-star Michael B. Jordan from the stage, but only after the show broke for a commercial. The television audience didn’t get to hear it.