*If you haven’t heard, actor, TV host and musician Nick Cannon recently released the scathing video “Too Broke to Vote” focusing on the current election cycle’s vote for popular presidential candidates will not change America’s outlook on war, poverty, and the criminal justice system.

With this theory, Cannon is basically urging African-Americans to not vote in the upcoming election. Wednesday (04-06-16) on “News One Now” host and managing editor Roland S. Martin and panelists discussed the many ways Cannon’s theory is problematic for the Black community.

“We’re a representative democracy. That means that once you vote and you put that representative in place, it’s your obligation to be sure that that individual does what you sent that individual there to do,” political scientist Dr. Wilmer Leon, II said. “It’s a great rap that Nick Cannon has. I love the rhythm, but he offers no solution as Lupe Fiasco did in 2012 and as with P. Diddy with Vote or Die before that. It was a great shirt, it was a great slogan, but there was nothing substantive behind it.”

Watch the conversation about Nick Cannon’s “Too Broke to Vote”:

Monique W. Morris, Ed. D., author of Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools, joined the show today to speak about the quieted subject of Black Girls being affected by the school to prison pipeline as much or sometimes more than their Black boy counterparts.

Morris said, “It’s important to focus on the way we prime our girls for victimization. From the nursery rhymes we sing as well as the ways in which we look at our girls and try to police their behavior. All of this is rendering them not only vulnerable to being invisible in discourses about how we engage in educational reform, but how we read what a so-called attitude is and how we respond to that when girls are often engaged of practices of critical thinking. When they’re asking questions, how about you see her as someone engaged in active critical thinking. We should celebrate her for her ability to ask questions that are poignant and engage in not a suppression of her identity but an uplift of it.”

Watch the conversation on the criminalization of Black girls:

 

ABOUT NEWS ONE NOW:

Emanating from the heart of Washington D.C. in a state-of-the-art studio that offers a stunning view of the Capitol building, News One Now airs Monday through Friday on TV One from 7-8 a.m. ET.  News One Now is hosted by Roland S. Martin, the 2013 National Association of Black Journalists’ Journalist of the Year and former host of TV One’s long-running, award-winning weekly news program, Washington Watch with Roland Martin.  Each morning, Martin – who also serves as the program’s managing editor – sifts through the headlines of the day to spotlight matters that greatly impact the African American community. In addition to television, News One Now reaches audiences 24/7 with exclusive program content and extended editorial on NewsOne.com and the NewsOne mobile app.  News One Now is an evolution of Interactive One’s award-winning digital brand NewsOne.com that launched in 2008 and reaches millions of African Americans each month. Susan Henry is executive producer of News One Now. D’Angela Proctor is TV One’s head of original programming and production.