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*The artist behind the red, beige and blue “Hope” poster of Barack Obama that became ubiquitous during his 2008 campaign has created artwork for the incoming president as well – among them, three posters featuring Muslim, Latino, and African-American women.

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“We thought (they) were the three groups that had been maybe criticized by Trump and maybe were going to be most, if not necessarily vulnerable in a literal sense, most feeling that their needs would be neglected in a Trump administration,” said artist Shepard Fairey in an interview with CNN.

Fairey’s new set of protest images were created with artists Jessica Sabogal and Ernesto Yerena of the non-profit Amplifier Foundation – a self-described “art machine for social change” – as part of the organization’s We the People campaign.

“It’s really about making sure that people remember that ‘we the people’ means everyone, it means all the people,” Fairey said. “I think the campaigns were very divisive, more from one side than the other. But (it’s) just reminding people to find their common humanity, and look beyond maybe one narrow definition of what it means to be American.”

Shepard Fairey in front of the "Hope" poster of Barack Obama he created 2008

Shepard Fairey in front of the “Hope” poster of Barack Obama he created 2008

The campaign’s objective, as stated in its Kickstarter page, is to “flood” Washington with symbols of hope on Inauguration Day.

“On January 20th, if this campaign succeeds, we’re going to take out full-page ads in the Washington Post with these images, so that people across the capitol and across the country will be able to carry them into the streets, hang them in windows, or paste them on walls,” organizers wrote.

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So far, more than $1.3 million has been pledged, exceeding the Amplifier Foundation’s $60,000 target.