*Attorney Antonio Moore discusses the recent comments by President Donald Trump to police in New York about thugs and criminals.

Moore makes the argument that President Trump showed that he does not think #blacklivesmatter in America.

Moore dissects the misuse of the word “Thug” to describe the reality faced in Baltimore by Freddie Grey, and also by others in urban centers like Baltimore across the country.

He also looks at statements by President Obama, and former Mayor of Baltimore Rawlings calling the Baltimore rioters “thugs” after the civil unrest of 2015. Subscribe to learn more on Youtube @tonetalks

President Trump’s Remarks:

“When you guys put somebody in the car and you’re protecting their head, you know, the way you put their hand over?” Trump said, miming the physical motion of an officer shielding a suspect’s head to keep it from bumping against the squad car.

“Like, don’t hit their head, and they just killed somebody — don’t hit their head,” Trump continued. “I said, you can take the hand away, okay?”

Trump also stated “these thugs being thrown into the back of a paddy wagon,”

These comments are clearly referencing the recent incident where now deceased Baltimore resident Freddie Gray was picked up by Police placed in a police van without being properly secured, and allegedly had spinal injuries as a result.

Wikipedia: On April 12, 2015, Freddie Carlos Gray, Jr., a 25-year-old Black American man, was arrested by the Baltimore Police Department for possessing what the police alleged was an illegal switchblade under Baltimore law.[2] While being transported in a police van, Gray fell into a coma and was taken to a trauma center.[3][4] Gray died on April 19, 2015; his death was ascribed to injuries to his spinal cord.[4] On April 21, 2015, pending an investigation of the incident, six Baltimore police officers were suspended with pay.[3]

The circumstances of the injuries were initially unclear; eyewitness accounts suggested that the officers involved used unnecessary force against Gray during the arrest—a claim denied by all officers involved.[3][4][5] Commissioner Anthony W. Batts reported that, contrary to department policy,[6] the officers did not secure him inside the van while driving to the police station; this policy had been put into effect six days prior to Gray’s arrest, following review of other transport-related injuries sustained during police custody in the city, and elsewhere in the country during the preceding years.[7] The medical investigation found that Gray had sustained the injuries while in transport.[8][9] The medical examiner’s office concluded that Gray’s death could not be ruled an accident, and was instead a homicide, because officers failed to follow safety procedures “through acts of omission.”[10] On May 1, 2015, the Baltimore City State’s Attorney, Marilyn Mosby, announced her office had filed charges against six police officers after the medical examiner’s report ruled Gray’s death a homicide.[11]