dmx - via tmz

DMX (via TMZ)

DMX could be sent back to prison for violating bail*One day … maybe one day SOON, DMX is gonna want to use his “get out of jail” card and will have expired, so to speak.

Sometimes we wonder if dude is playing with all his marbles. His latest reason to make us wonder is the Russian Roulette kinda game he seems to be playing with the judge overseeing his IRS case and basically, his life.

If you haven’t heard, the rapper/actor is accused of cheating the IRS out of $1.7 million in taxes and he could be headed back to prison for violating the conditions of his bail.

On Wednesday, Manhattan federal judge Jed Rakoff  said he received a report indicating that the X man (real name: Earl Simmons) “may have violated the terms of his pretrial release in numerous respects.”

RELATED NEWS: DMX BUSTS A FREESTYLE WHILE LEAVING MANHATTAN COURT (WATCH)

DMX performs onstage during the Bad Boy Family Reunion Tour at The Forum on October 4, 2016 in Inglewood, California.

DMX performs onstage during the Bad Boy Family Reunion Tour at The Forum on October 4, 2016 in Inglewood, California.

What happened was he left NYC to check on family in St. Louis, without telling the judge … and he could pay a serious price for that indiscretion.

“He left the jurisdiction without permission,” which he is not allowed to do, his lawyer with the colorful name, Murray “Don’t Worry” Richman, told The NY Post.

Richman also told TMZ  it was just a matter of the rapper just forgot, because he was preoccupied with the trip.

Richman says X usually notifies his probation officer if he’s leaving New York to perform, so this is unlike him. He’s guessing the judge will show a little mercy and just up the restrictions — like requiring an ankle bracelet — but Richman vows to fight it.

The bottom line is that Judge Rakoff has ordered DMX/Earl Simmons to appear in his courtroom on Friday (08-11-17), where he could be called to the carpet over the violations.

Last month EUR reported that DMX is facing 14 counts of evading more than $1 mil in federal taxes.