*Attorney Antonio Moore discusses new data released by Harvard showing an increase to over 14 percent African American admission.

Moore looks deeper into the inclusion of Africans, Biracial, and Caribbeans to mask lack of enrollment of descendants of American Slavery.

Moore’s piece “Slavery’s Shadow: Reparations and the Cost to Build a Nation”

Excerpt: Blacks saw their free labor and bodies create mass fortunes the modern world had never seen before in steel mines for companies like U.S. Steel in Alabama during the 1920’s, on fields of cotton in the Carolinas in the 1820’s, and on tobacco fields throughout Virginia in the 1720’s.

Due to the length and economics of American slavery, it serves not just as a chapter in American history, but rather it is the foundation that created this country’s global economic advantage.

The fundamental reality, as so eloquently shown by Coates, is that American slavery was an institution that did not abruptly end in the late 1800’s. Rather, its lasting effects and policies continued well beyond.

We see in pieces like the book “Slavery by Another Name”, and the preceding Wall Street Journal article “From Alabama’s Past, Capitalism Teamed With Racism to Create Cruel Partnership” both written by Douglas Blackmon, slavery left a lasting shadow over the entire American economy.

Blackmon’s work outlines how slave labor reformed itself through the use of prison labor as steel replaced cotton in America’s production cycle. Prison labor, an alternative source of free labor which disenfranchised the same group of blacks, was born through the use of laws such as the 13th Amendment which stated “neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted.”

As a result the recipients of slavery’s benefits built empires that still stand today and pushed slavery’s past economic effects into modern financial realities.