Winston Churchill (Gary Oldman, 4th from left) talks and shakes hands with subway riders inclusing David Olawale Ayinde (3rd from left) in ‘Darkest Hour.’

The Man Who Invented Christmas,” part of the holiday lineup is apropos for the season’s official kick-off. “Coco” comes out at a time parents are looking for kid friendly films; and “Darkest Hour” is fitting for these dangerous and dark times. As Winston Churchill would say, “You  cannot reason with a tiger when your head is in his mouth.”

Director Joe Wright says the “Darkest Hour” shows Churchill resisting the tide of bigotry, hate, and fascism. He also suggests it reflects the current U.S. president’s abrasive, confrontational form of leadership. Against his pundits and royal protocol, Churchill took to the Underground and asked ordinary citizens what they thought.

 Gary Oldman is amazing as Churchill, the Prime Minister who faced off on Hitler in WWII and won. Although many movies have been done on the life of Churchill, the “Darkest Hour” feels more like an action thriller and less like a docudrama. Kristin Scott Thomas, Stephen Dillane, and Ronald Pickup.

The Man Who Invented Christmas

the man who invented christmas

The Man Who Invented Christmas” tells of the magical journey that led to the creation of Ebenezer Scrooge (Christopher Plummer), Tiny Tim and other classic characters from A Christmas Carol. Directed by Bharat Nalluri, the film shows how Charles Dickens (Dan Stevens) mixed real life inspirations with his vivid imagination to conjure up characters and a timeless tale, forever changing the holiday season into the celebration we know today.

The point is made that nobody—even Scrooge—could be so heartless as to value profit over subsidized health care for poor children [hint, hint]. In addition to striking home with its prevalent messages and humorous moments, the writers’ block segments were really dear to a lot of us journos.

Coco

Miguel at family reunion in the Land of the Dead in ‘Coco.’ ©2017 Disney•Pixar. All Rights Reserved.

“Coco,” directed by Lee Unkrich & Adrian Molina, follows the traditional theme common in Mexican culture and animated movies like “The Book of Life” that features dead individuals.

Despite his family’s generations-old ban on music, Miguel (Anthony Gonzalez) dreams of becoming a musician like his idol, Ernesto de la Cruz (Benjamin Bratt). Desperate to prove his talent, Miguel finds himself in the Land of the Dead following a mysterious chain of events.

On his journey to unlock the story behind Miguel’s family history, he meets up with trickster Hector (Gael García Bernal). Together they unlocked the story behind Miguel’s family history. The film, bursting with live colors in the land of “I see dead people,” will no doubt keep the kids engaged.

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