Meek MIll and Judge Genece E. Brinkley

Meek MIll and Judge Genece E. Brinkley

*A court filing on Monday reportedly revealed that Meek Mill had urged the FBI to investigate his judge, but then refused to cooperate once the probe was underway – thereby cutting the investigation short, reports Philly.com.

Philadelphia Judge Genece E. Brinkley had repeatedly concluded that the rapper had violated the terms of his probation and sent him back to prison for 2 to 4 years, sparking nationwide protests.

According to the court filing, Mill’s legal team raised doubts to the FBI about Brinkley’s integrity and claimed she could not be counted on to be impartial. It was Mill himself who pressed the Feds to investigate, and an inquiry into the judge was opened.

But it was also Mill who single-handedly ended the inquiry when he suddenly stopped cooperating.

The details below, via The Philadelphia Inquirer:

The Inquirer and Daily News sources say that Mill’s complaint to the FBI began after a February 2016 meeting in Brinkley’s chambers during which the rapper claimed the judge made a number of inappropriate requests.

The transcript of their conversation has been sealed since last year at the request of Mill and his then-lawyer Frank DeSimone.

But [current lawyer Joseph] Tacopina has alleged in court filings that during the meeting Brinkley urged Mill to drop his current management company, Jay-Z’s Roc Nation, and return to Philadelphia-based Charles “Charlie Mack” Alston, who worked with Mill earlier in his career. She also asked Mill to record a cover of a Boyz II Men song and to mention her name in it, Tacopina has said.

The agents who asked Mill to record conversations with the judge in 2016 had hoped to corroborate the rapper’s claims about what he believed to be Brinkley’s attempt to extort him, the sources familiar with the inquiry say.

Mill has rapped in the past that he’s no snitch, including in a 2013 track “Heaven or Hell”: Before I snitch y’all gotta burn a hole in my tongue. His refusal to tape the judge brought an end to the federal probe, the sources say.

It remains unclear what other steps – if any – agents might have taken to investigate the matter before Mill ended their cooperation.

In their court filing Monday, Mill’s lawyers argued that Brinkley’s mere knowledge of the 2016 FBI inquiry poses a conflict that should prompt her to recuse herself – even if the probe was initiated by Mill and then dragged into public view this year by the rapper’s defenders.

Mill, meanwhile, remains incarcerated in a state prison in Camp Hill, Pa., serving the two-to-four-year sentence Brinkley imposed last month for repeated violations of his probation on a 2008 drug and gun case.

The judge has denied him bail while his lawyers continue to appeal her decision to the Pennsylvania Superior Court.

In other Meek Mill news, the rapper reportedly has several different jobs while on lockdown at Pennsylvania’s SCI Chester, where he’s part of the general labor crew.

According to TMZ:

Meek “cleans the cell block, tidies up prison grounds and washes dishes. He also cooks food and serves it up, too! He does it all with a smile, apparently, while earning just 19 cents per hour. The rep says he’s a model inmate who gets some juicy perks due to good behavior. Meek gets access to electrical and carpentry shops, and he’s waitlisted for some therapy courses.